Coding Projects


In progress - more projects will be added soon


Visualization of feature matching, an intermediate step of the panorama stitching pipeline.

Visualization of feature matching, an intermediate step of the panorama stitching pipeline.

Automatic Panorama Stitching

Fall 2015

This was begun as a final project for CS 89: Computational Aspects of Digital Photography, taught by Professor Wojciech Jarosz. The completed portion, at the time of submission, included over 1400 lines of C++ code that I authored. The code for this project includes basecode and solutions to some of the course assignments, so it is not publicly available, but samples could be made available via individual request. An overview of the project, my process, and the results I obtained can be found at the following link:

https://makaturafinalproject.wordpress.com


Screen Shot 2016-12-02 at 10.46.02 PM.png

Personal Website

Summer/Fall 2015

This project sought to implement a personal website designed by a west-coast filmmaker, Andrew Golden. I spent 3 days of my interim break between terms implementing this website from scratch as a personal exercise in basic web development. This project was written in CSS, HTML, and PHP, and made use of the Bootstrap library. The code can be found on my GitHub. While this site was moved to a different platform for ease of maintenance, the project proved a valuable exercise for me.


Visual courtesy of SpringboardSEO

Visual courtesy of SpringboardSEO

Tiny Search Engine

Summer 2015

As one of my projects for CS50: Software Design and Implementation, taught by Professor Xia Zhou, I implemented a Tiny Search Engine with three components: crawler, indexer, and query. The code for this project was written in C, and is available upon request.


IMG_5374.jpg

Polyphonic Keyboard

Summer 2015

For our final project in CS56/ENGS31: Digital Electronics, I collaborated with Stylianos Tegas D'17 to design, code, construct, and document a polyphonic keyboard. This project was coded in VHDL, and implemented using a Nexys 3 FPGA with a few additional additions, such as 4 4-button pads, and an A/D converter, amplifier and speaker. 

The full project writeup, along with code and diagrams for implementation, can be seen here


The poster, as it was presented at the Karen E. Wetterhahn Science Symposium in May 2014.

The poster, as it was presented at the Karen E. Wetterhahn Science Symposium in May 2014.

Visualizing influenza vaccine data with hierarchical clustering

Winter, Spring 2014

This project was funded by the Women in Science Project, and was completed under the supervision of Professor Chris Bailey-Kellogg and Dr. Karen Dowell. Using a dataset from a study conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, I sought to visualize the efficacy of various influenza vaccines in order to extract meaningful relationships in the results. While the implications of my results were inconclusive, I got valuable experience working with R and RStudio. This internship also served as my first real exposure to Computer Science.